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In the Spotlight

  • New in Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology

    The Annual Cycle and Natural History of a Subtropical Atlantic Forest Avifauna in Paraguay
    The Annual Cycle and Natural History of a Subtropical Atlantic Forest Avifauna in Paraguay
    Mercedes S. Foster, Ned K. Johnson (Author)

    Avifauna in a subtropical humid forest around Hotel El Tirol, Department of Itapúa, Paraguay is studied. The study site is part of the Atlantic Forest biome, a critically endangered biodiversity hot spot. We recorded 205 species of birds in 45 families and provide information on their annual cycles and natural history from collected specimens and field observations. 

  • Latest in Contributions to Zoology

    Type Specimens of Hawaiian Land Snails in the Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, with Lectotype Designations
    Type Specimens of Hawaiian Land Snails in the Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, with Lectotype Designations
    Norine Yeung, Robert H Cowie, Kenneth A Hayes, Ellen E Strong (Author)

    Pacific island land snail faunas are among the most threatened faunas in the world, and Hawaiian land snails are among the most species-rich and most severely affected of these faunas. Rigorous taxonomic treatment and comprehensive study of type material of the group is needed if taxonomic and conservation status of the many species is to be ascertained. This annotated catalog provides details of the material held in Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History.

  • New in Paleobiology

    Plant Fossils from the Pennsylvanian–Permian Transition in Western Pangea, Abo Pass, New Mexico
    Plant Fossils from the Pennsylvanian–Permian Transition in Western Pangea, Abo Pass, New Mexico
    William A. DiMichele, Spencer G. Lucas, Cindy V. Looy, Hans Kerp, Dan S. Chaney (Author)

    Paleobotany is what this one is all about! Bill DiMichele and coauthors tease out important data on the 1940-41 fossil plant collections from five stratigraphic levels by field geologist/paleobotanist Charles B. Read, whose field notes cannot be located. Thus secondary sources were used to assess stratigraphic intervals covered by the collections. Specimens examined are in the permanent collections of the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History.

Open Monograph Press Public Knowledge Project